Youtubers/Bloggers Who Talk About Their Mental Health Problems/Illnesses

LikeKirsten

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Facebook // Instagram // Youtube // Blog // Twitter

As a teenager, Kirsten suffered from depression and anxiety. At the beginning, she neither knew what she had nor who to talk to. This was until she started Googling and realised that there were others like her.

She has been creating mental health content for over 4 years, and her videos are more factual and realistic than medical, which was her aim all along. Despite her dream of working in film, she actually ended up graduating with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology.

Marinashutup

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Youtube // Twitter // Tumblr // Instagram // Facebook

A mental health sufferer herself, Marina is a self-proclaimed feminist, with her own series called ‘Feminist Fridays’ on her channel. In one of her videos, she admits to not knowing she had depression despite her subscribers knowing she had the symptoms of the mental health illness. She is currently majoring in Women’s Studies.

Zoella

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Blog // Youtube // Instagram // Facebook // Twitter

Probably the most popular person on this list, Zoella has been quite outspoken on her struggles with social anxiety. But that didn’t stop her…

She’s published her own books and has her own beauty line. If this doesn’t inspire you to do more in life, I don’t know what will!

Kiera Rose

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Youtube // Instagram // Twitter // Facebook

This gorgeously tattooed green-eyed beauty has been outspoken on both her and her boyfriend’s battles with mental health illnesses. Kiera also suffers from dermatillomania, which is a mental disorder characterized by the repeated urge to pick at one’s own skin, often to the extent that damage is caused.

John Green

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Twitter // Blog // Facebook // Instagram // Youtube

Everyone knows him either as one half of the vlogbrothers, or as the author of the highly-successful novel Fault in Our Stars.

But did you know he’s a mental health sufferer? Yes, that’s right. John Green has opened up several times on his OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) on his Youtube channel.

Becki Brown

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Youtube // Twitter // Instagram // Facebook

Becki is mostly known for her video which records the progress of her hair loss due to trichotillomania (which is an impulse control disorder characterised by a long term urge that results in the pulling out of one’s hair) alongside other events of her life. Since that, she has been posting regularly on social media, and has been very open on the stigma surrounding mental health.

Danielle Mansutti

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Youtube // Instagram // Twitter // Facebook // Blog

A beauty both on the outside (as if you cannot see it!) and inside, Danielle opened up about her battles with social anxiety and depression back in 2016 in two separate videos. She even has a whole playlist dedicated to mental health-related videos.

Kati Morton

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Blog // Twitter // Youtube // Facebook // Instagram

Kati is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist who also creates Youtube content, building a global mental health online community, across a variety of platforms. Her videos are humorous and entertaining and educational at the same time.

LukeIsNotSexy

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Youtube // Twitter // Instagram // Facebook // Blog

In his video ‘My Depression Story’, he stated that while the subject is quite sensitive, he did not want to make the video sad, and that he is doing MUCH better now. He’s talked about himself and fellow Youtubers – his personal friends IRL – who have also battled with mental health. He tweets about mental health very often, using his usual banter, but it is not to make fun of other sufferers, but more to cheer others up.

Millie Smith

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Instagram // Twitter // Facebook // Youtube // Blog

This red-haired mother-of-one student nurse has been all over social media to promote body positivity and breaking the stigma surrounding the former and mental health, which she suffers from. If you’re looking for someone inspirational, realistic and brutally honest, she’s the person to follow. Her fiance also posts body positive photos, aimed for a male audience, on his Instagram.

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Mental Health First Aid

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This makes it official, right?

Well…! I’ve finally done it! The first of many steps towards breaking the stigma surrounding mental health problems in Malta:

I am a Mental Health First Aider!

Confetti it’s a parade!

Celebrations aside, this has been something I’ve wanted to do since forever. And it’s finally done. 2 Saturdays. 6 hours each. Lots of laughs and new friends. Breaking the stigma, one person at a time.

Why should one take a mental health first aid course?

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My experience

Over the past two sessions, I learned a lot of things about mental health, and took note of them. Having been through mental health problems gave me a good background of certain things, but some things were new to me, including ALGEE:

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ALGEE – the life-saving acronym

Algee, the mascot of MHFA, is this cutie pie:

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Algee the koala

Despite having the MHFA manual, which was given to us free of charge, I still took notes of my own, and they will be listed down below…

  • Mental health problem – not diagnosed but displays symptoms
  • Mental health illness – diagnosed
  • Image result for spectrum of interventions for mental health
  • NEVER leave a person alone if they need help!
  • Say you went through a “similar situation” NOT “same thing”
  • Image result for thoughts emotions behaviors triangle
  • Attack the behaviour not the person
  • Make sure of the following:
    • You care and want to help
    • Empathy
    • Help is available
    • Thoughts are very common
    • Encourage the person to do most of the talking
    • No threats/guilt
    • NEVER KEEP SUICIDE A SECRET
    • There are ways to address specific problems
    • Involve the person in who to be told about the problem
  • When person is in crisis – first aid
  • When person not in crisis – ALGEE
  • Panic attacks are
    • frightening but not dangerous
    • not all triggered
  • When in doubt, assume person is experiencing a panic attack, NOT a heart attack
  • When person says they’re having a panic attack and recovers – no intervention
  • Slow breathing helps BUT focusing on breathing can become an emotional crutch leading to difficulty with eventual treatment
  • Panic attack – not more than 10 minutes
  • Types of traumas:
    • Individual
    • Ongoing
    • Mass
    • Witnessing/hearing
    • – (I didn’t get the last one unfortunately)
  • Dissociative Identity Disorder = Multiple Personality Disorder but NOT = schizophrenia!
  • Psychosis = loss of contact from reality
  • Neither confirm nor deny someone with psychosis!
  • Schizophrenia should be diagnosed early – teens to early 20s
  • Borderline Personality Disorder NOT = Bipolar!
  • Schizoaffective – schizophrenia + bipolar/depression (mood disorder)
  • Helpful actions: *
    • Seeking help
    • Offer tea
    • Didn’t go inside
    • Good memories
    • Friendship to help
    • Calm + firm tone
    • Gave options
    • Showed concern
    • Seated
    • 90-degree angle
    • Listened/emphatic
    • Minimal reaction (present)
  • Unhelpful actions: *
    • Sarcasm
    • Judgemental
    • Showed fear
    • Tone of voice
    • Remained standing
    • Arguing with delusions
    • Anxious
    • Insane
    • Calling help behind his back
    • Speaking about Peter in front of him
    • Facial expressions
  • What is affected by substance use disorders? The 4 Ls
    • Livelihood
    • Love
    • Liver
    • Law
  • Three types of substances:
    • Depressants
    • Hallocages
    • Stimulants

* Points taken during a video about MFHA: Psychosis taken from the MHFA Australia DVD


So these were all the points I jotted down throughout the 12-hour course, including some pictures used during the presentations. As a disclaimer, I would like to point out that despite this certification, I CANNOT diagnose ANYONE, but simply ASSIST the person in case of mental health problems. For a diagnosis, please seek professional help (GPs, psychologist, psychiatrists, psychotherapists, etc.)

 

Why I Still Go to Therapy… and why it’s OK

This is probably one of those posts where I had a thousand of ideas, and yet I never really knew how to form those ideas in a decent post. That, and I found it really difficult writing this post. Because the stigma surrounding mental health is still there. I was told by my family not to write about this, but I refuse to be silenced.

I am recovering from depression and anxiety. I’m happier than I ever was, and am in a good place, both physically and mentally.

Yet I still go to psychiatric therapy. And I still take my medication.

And it’s okay.

Continue reading “Why I Still Go to Therapy… and why it’s OK”

Let your body do the Yoga

Anyone living with pain (whether physical or emotional) can tell you that it takes over your whole life. You become somewhat isolated from everything and everyone, including your own body. Having a strong relationship with your body is important because it is the gateway to awareness, and it is from awareness that change can begin.

Continue reading “Let your body do the Yoga”

Dim the Spotlight on… Chris Cornell [#1]

This is a new series which consists of me looking back at artists I love and have influenced me that are unfortunately no longer alive.

My earliest memory of Cornell is when I heard the song ‘Black Hole Sun’ playing on VH1 Classic when I was a pre-teen. As I usually do with every song I like, I searched all I could about the band, lead singer and songs.

You could say I was instantly hooked.

Black Hole Sun

The lyrics, particularly those of ‘Black Hole Sun’ really spoke to me, and I could tell from both the lyrics and my research that what Chris Cornell was singing truly came from his heart and how personal it was.

It’s just sort of a surreal dreamscape, a weird, play-with-the-title kind of song. He also that “lyrically it’s probably the closest to me just playing with words for words’ sake, of anything written. I guess it worked for a lot of people who heard it, but I have no idea how you’d begin to take that one literally. It’s funny because hits are usually sort of congruent, sort of an identifiable lyric idea, and that song pretty much had none. The chorus lyric is kind of beautiful and easy to remember.

Other than that, I sure didn’t have an understanding of it I was just sucked in by the music and I was painting a picture with the lyrics. There was no real idea to get across.” the song was misinterpreted as being positive, No one seems to get this, but ‘Black Hole Sun’ is sad. But because the melody is really pretty, everyone thinks it’s almost chipper, which is ridiculous!

Mental Health

Cornell battled drug addiction at a young age (13 years of age), to the extent of starvation. He starved so badly he had to be sent to rehab for a while to recover from both his drug addiction. He only got clean when he met his second wife, Vicky. Of this, he says, “It was a long period of coming to the realisation that [being sober] is better. Going through rehab, honestly, did help… it got me away from just the daily drudgery of depression and either trying to not drink or do drugs or doing them.

“They give you such a simple message that any idiot can get and it’s just over and over. But the bottom line is really, and this is the part that is scary for everyone, the individual kinda has to want it. Not kinda, you have to want it and to not do that crap anymore or you will never stop and it will just kill you.”

Demise

He was found dead inside the bathroom of his Detroit hotel room just mere hours after performing with Soundgarden. I found out about his death on my way to work and I was distraught. I couldn’t believe it, and it seems, neither did his wife, friends or fans all around the world. It was later revealed that he took his own life by hanging.

And this is why I wanted to start the series in the first place, because people would think something like “Kill himself why? He had everything: a great career, wife, family, money, fame…! What more could he possibly want?!”

You need to realise that famous people are also humans. They bleed like us, they have feelings like us, and they breathe like us. They feel happiness, anger and sadness just like the rest of us. So don’t you dare say “He had it all”.

No.

He had everything and nothing. He was happy and sad. Living and not. (A metaphor which makes complete sense in my head but not in the writing, but I wrote it anyways because I don’t know how to explain it).

The Skinny on… Stigma

They say to never a judge a book by its cover. And yet, we judge those who look and behave differently from us. By “us” I mean humanity in general. I know many people who don’t judge those different from them.

I am one of them.

Before being clinically diagnosed with depression and anxiety, I was considered a quiet, anti-social outcast with weird tastes in music, books and fashion. I was called weirdo for not interacting with others “normally”. (Disclaimer: I am in NO WAY calling anyone normal. Just generalising…!

What was wrong with this description? The stigma. Since when was being shy associated with being a weirdo? I know shy people who are more “normal” (again, just generalising) than me, and have greater fashion sense than anyone I know. Now I’m not saying all shy people are like this because . . . look at me!

Another myth surrounding depression is that anyone feeling ‘sad’ is said to be depressed. Um, since when?! Everyone gets sad at one point in life, but they are far from depressed in most cases. Imagine this: I was told I was just a ‘sad’ person, then some 11 years later, I was diagnosed. Not all sadness is the same, as much as it isn’t all depression.

If you do think that you have symptoms of depression, please consult your doctor or a psychologist for a proper diagnosis and guidance for recovery.


I can’t believe what I wrote…

It made so much sense in my head, but now, seeing it in writing… I don’t even know what I’m trying to say except to stop stigmatizing mental health.

Yep, that’s the whole point.

Letter to Alice (Anxiety) and Dina (Depression)

Alice, Dina… we need to talk about some things. Well, it has been a while since we’ve last spoken to each other. I hope you two are comfortably sat down because this might be a long one.

Continue reading “Letter to Alice (Anxiety) and Dina (Depression)”